Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Tombstone Tuesday - Christina Henschel Hübsch Grave Found!

My 2nd great-grandmother Christina Henschel Hübsch was buried in the Lutheran Home Cemetery in Arlington Heights, Cook County, Illinois.  (Click any image to enlarge.)

Grave of Christina Henschel Hübsch,
Lutheran Home Cemetery, Arlington Heights, Cook, Illinois
Image Credit: Denise Hibsch Richmond 19 Sep 2015 

The real story is how I found her.

Dead Ends
Christina died on 21 Jan 1916 at an “old people’s home” in the Chicago suburb of Arlington Heights, Cook County, Illinois with burial in the same city according to her death certificate. 

Why couldn’t the death certificate informant be more specific?  Stop whining I tell myself, be grateful that you have her death certificate.  I am.  Besides, genealogy isn’t easy.

Christina’s last residence and burial site remained elusive for several years for my cousin and research partner, Linda Hibsch Reeder, and I.   We wrote letters, made phone calls and mined the Internet for cemeteries and funeral homes.  No luck.

Burial at the historic St. Johannes and Resthaven Cemeteries near O'Hare International Airport was considered at one point.  Linda learned of the proposed airport runway expansion which meant that the interments had to be relocated.  A lawsuit was filed to prevent the relocation.  Linda’s inquiries resulted in an invitation to join the lawsuit but she declined since it wasn’t clear that Christina was buried there. The dispute ended in 2012; nearly 1,500 bodies were relocated.

Get Local
Frustrated with the lack of progress, I hired Chicago-based researcher Terri O’Connell, the owner of Finding Our Ancestors, a professional genealogy company specializing in Chicago research.  I hoped her knowledge of local resources and ability to visit onsite could help find the official name of the "old people's home" where Christina died and her burial place.  I emailed Terri all the particulars I had on Christina and waited patiently.  

Success!  With persistence and patience, Terri O'Connell found Christina’s last residence and cemetery location. 

The Altenheim
Christina was an "inmate" of the Altenheim Gesellschaft and was buried in the cemetery that was associated with it.  The German word "Altenheim" translates to “old people’s home”; "Gesellschaft" translates to "community and society".  Thanks to four years of high school German, pronouncing these words wasn't difficult for me but admittedly, “Old People's Home” is easier to say.

Treasure at the Local Library
The image below was excerpted from a book found at the Arlington Heights Memorial Library titled “Some German Name Cemeteries - Cook County, IL” by Gertrude W. Lundberg.

Thank you Gertrude!

See Christina next to my squiggly red arrow on page 3 of the interments at the Lutheran Old People's Home Cemetery. 
Source: Lundberg, Gertrude W. Some German Name Cemeteries - Cook County, IL.
Publisher Unknown. Arlington Heights Memorial Library, 929.3773.
Image Credit: Terri O'Connell

Close-up of this Listing
Unfortunately, the author did not provide sources for her book or the publication date.  I think she just walked the cemetery taking notes from each headstone. 

Author’s transcription: Huersch, Christ. (H.) 28 _ pri1 1842- 21 Jan 191?

  • Huersch: I see Huebsch on the stone but maybe because I’m familiar with various spellings, but never with an “r”.  My family surname Hübsch changed to Huebsch then Hibsch over the years.  Her death certificate clearly spelled the name Huebsch.   
  • Christ.: I see Christe.  Her first name was Christina on early records.
  • (H.):  I didn’t see an “H” on the stone.  Perhaps the author interpreted the “E” as an “H” and thought it was her middle initial.  Coincidentally, Christina’s maiden name was Henschel.
  • 28 _pril 1842: birth date.  The month of birth on the stone, Apr, was clear to me.
  • 21 Jan 191?:  death date.  The year on the stone,1916, was clear to me.    

Help from the Lutheran Home
The cemetery book at the library really opened the door for this research project.  With a copy of page 3 in hand, Terri contacted the Lutheran Home to request additional records.  Luckily she was connected with a nice man who said the facility didn’t keep records back to 1916 but he would contact someone who had already done research in their old records.  Tick-tock.  Terri let some time lapse before re-contacting the facility knowing full well that genealogical research was not their priority.  Patience paid off as Terri was provided a document showing names and grave locations at the cemetery.

Source:  Lutheran Old People's Home Cemetery List [Grave Location],
Lutheran Home, Arlington Heights, Cook, IL.
Image Credit: Terri O'Connell

Transcription of the listing [Header] Reading from South to North, Row 3 cont.
[Plot] 42. Christe Huebsch 4/23/18?? – 1/21/1916

Terri’s Description of the the Cemetery
“She is buried in the Lutheran Home Cemetery in Arlington Heights. It is a very small cemetery with burials going back to the late 1800's. I have walked the cemetery twice and could not find her grave. To be honest, there are many stones that are worn from the elements and could not be read. There is a space where there is no marker for two spots as well. Plus, there is one stone that has a tree stump that has grown in front of the stone and they now look like they have become one unit."

View of Lutheran Home Cemetery, Arlington Heights, Cook, Illinois
Image Credit:  Terri O'Connell

Thumbs Up to Hiring a Researcher
How wonderful it is to have Christina's burial mystery solved thanks to professional researcher Terri O’Connell.  I highly recommend her.  She can be reached at: Phone: (773) 962-1609; Email: Terri@FindingOurAncestors.net; Website:  www.FindingOurAncestors .

Next Steps
Find Christina's place of birth in Prussia, current-day Poland!

My husband and I recently vacationed in Chicago, a bucket list item.  Terri learned that I was in town and asked if I was going to visit Christina’s grave.  No, I said because I was too scared to drive in the big city.  I didn’t want to ask her because I thought it was too much to ask.  But Terri offered, perhaps insisted, that she take me to the cemetery.  So I agreed and I’m glad I did.  Not only did I visit the grave and leave a note, I got to know Terri better over lunch.  I am so fortunate to be the recipient of such a random act of genealogical kindness!

Sunday, August 9, 2015

Cordelia Bashor Matthews, 1865-1951 - Church, Temperance and Magic Birdseed

I'm excited to introduce Jim Letchworth as Guest Blogger.  Jim wrote this wonderful story about his great grandmother.  Jim is my paternal third cousin.

Cordelia Bashor Matthews was most commonly known as Delia or Dee.  My father, her grandson, always referred to her as Mama Dee.  I am told other family members called her Aunt Dee.

Cordelia Bashor Matthews
Photo: Jim Letchworth Personal Collection
Early Years
The youngest of eleven children of Martin and Susannah Bashor, she was born May 25, 1865 at Union Star in DeKalb County, Missouri.  Her family (farmers for generations) was in the midst of a slow westward migration.  Her father, Martin, was born in 1817 in Shenandoah, Virginia and her mother Susannah Sherfy was born in 1822 in Jonesboro, Tennessee.  They were married in 1843 in Washington County, Tennessee.  Of Delia’s siblings, the older eight were born in Tennessee and the younger three in Missouri.

Delia came to California with her folks about 1883 when she was 18.  The Bashors, or alternately spelled Bashores, were considered southern California pioneers.  The Covina valley and most of southern California was sparsely populated then.  The Bashors added a lot of population just within the family.  Delia’s father, Martin Bashor, and his brother, John Cooper Bashor married two sisters: Susannah and Elizabeth Sherfy.  As I mentioned, Martin and Susannah had eleven children; John and Elizabeth had seven at this time.  There is a family history story that I had ancestors who traveled west via covered wagon.  I believe it was the Bashor family though I do not know if it was this trip to California or their earlier migration from Tennessee to Missouri or both.

Some thirty years earlier the California Gold Rush had focused on the Sierras and San Francisco up north.  Los Angeles was considered a “cow county” with hot, dusty farm fields subject to flash flooding in the winter time.  There was no gold in Los Angeles.  The Bashors were part of a migration of farmers, many from the Midwest states such as Ohio, Illinois, Indiana and even Missouri who saw opportunity to work the land in the San Gabriel valley.  The Bashors were instrumental in converting the fields of grain to citrus, especially oranges.

I have a newspaper reference of a meeting at her father Martin’s house in Covina on June 20, 1885. The meeting established the first church building in Covina, a Methodist-Episcopal church.  This was about two years after he arrived.  Interestingly many of the Bashors including Martin and Susannah, did not stay in southern California but moved on to Colorado to the Longmont and Hygiene area of Boulder County.  However, Delia remained in southern California as did many other Bashors who grew to local prominence such as Delia’s cousins Madison Bashor, John (Jacob) Klepper Bashor and her older sister Martha (Ma) Bashor who married William Hibsch and, after his death, John Collette.

Newspapers were a big part of Delia’s life.  In 1888, as a 23 year old woman, she owned an interest in the Gladstone Exponent which was published in the Covina area.  In 1890, she and eleven other investors with $75 each started the Argus Publishing Co.  She was secretary of the company in 1895 when it was sold to James Louis Matthews whom she would later marry.

The Man in Delia's Life
The story of Delia cannot be told without her husband, Louie.  James Lewis Matthews was an energetic man, born in Bristol, England.  He was six years younger than Cordelia.  His family immigrated to Manitoba, Canada in 1883; the same time the Bashors arrived in Los Angeles County, California.  In 1894, after multiple Canadian winters, he sought the sunnier clime of southern California.  Looking for work in Pasadena, he overheard a man say he was looking for a printer.  Having some printing experience, Louie approached the man, offered his services and was hired on the spot.  Louie arrived in tiny, dusty Covina on a buckboard to work for the Argus newspaper.  Three months later he bought the company.  Three years later on August 31, 1897 he and Delia were married in perhaps the largest and most important social event of the season.

1901 Covina Argus
Source: Newspapers.com
Louie remained as publisher and editor of this respected weekly until his death in 1945.  He was an enthusiastic and tireless promoter of Covina and the surrounding San Gabriel valley.  He helped secure the Southern Pacific railroad right of way through Covina in 1896.  The railroad was key to the export of fresh oranges to eastern markets.  He helped bring the Pacific Electric line to Covina in 1903; this was the famous red car trolley line, built throughout the Los Angeles basin which allowed the citizens of Covina to visit the seashore faster in those days than one can drive the same distance today.  In 1904, Louie became the postmaster.  He served as president of the Chamber of Commerce and touted the virtues of the healthful southern California lifestyle, living in the sunshine among the fragrant orange groves.  The Rose Parade on New Year’s Day was a way to promote the sunny California lifestyle to folks back home in the winter snows.  That is why the Rose Bowl games were traditionally played by teams from the West versus teams from the Midwest.  By the way, in the Arcadia Publishing book Covina, there is a photo of Delia accompanying the 1916 Covina Beauty Queen in the parade.

Louie was also involved in real estate promotion and multiple civic improvements.  He served on the Los Angeles County Grand Jury of 1910 for which he was the Secretary.  In about 1916, flood control was finally being addressed, and Louie was instrumental in raising bonds to build multiple dams to prevent the periodic flash floods which roared down the slopes of the San Gabriel Mountains.  He was also very involved in Republican Party politics from the time of the progressives.  Louie played a role in the placement of the commemorative Mission Bells along the El Camino Real (The King’s Road) or Highway 101 in California.  He served as one of five commissioners for the California Department of Unemployment Insurance from 1936 to 1943.  James Lewis Matthews was my great-grandfather; he is the person for whom I was named as James Matthew Letchworth.

Delia's Family and Active Life
As a young woman, Delia was very active in church activities.  I have a small bible stories book printed in 1830 which was a gift to Susannah, Delia’s mother, and which she handed down to Delia.  I found several references to her participation in the Epworth League which was a Methodist association for young adults (18 to 35 years old).  Later Delia was president of the Deaconess board of the Los Angeles county Methodist-Episcopal church.  She was also president of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union.  Yes, I do believe she was a teatotaler.  On the civic side, she was also a charter member and past president of the Covina Women’s Club.

Delia and Louie had two daughters: Lucile Diane Matthews, born September 29, 1898 and Ethelyn Genevieve (Gen) Matthews born January 8, 1902.  They both married local Covina boys.  Lucile married Horace (Hod) White and Gen, my grandmother, married William Pryor (Pie) Letchworth II.  Hod and Lucile relocated to Honolulu, Hawaii and Gen and Pie to Berkeley, California where Pie graduated from the University.  I do not know about Lucile whom I remember meeting when I was a child, but Gen, my grandmother, must have been quite rebellious as a young woman.  Gen played piano at many social gatherings mentioned in the Covina Argus but she also sneaked out and took an aeroplane ride without consent - a two-seater as the story goes.  There were other acts of rebellion as well; and unlike her mother, she was not a teatotaler.

Delia and Louie Matthews, 1906, possibly sailing to Santa Catalina
Photo: Jim Letchworth Personal Collection
I have a couple of handwritten letters from Mama Dee written to her grandson, my father, William (Bill) Pryor Letchworth Jr., who tended to save many things.  The letters are loving, encouraging and optimistic - very grandmotherly.  There were two particular occasions; the first was near the conclusion of a cross country trip my father and his younger brother, Jerry, took as teenagers to visit relatives in western New York State.  It was a road trip with a college student hired to drive the boys in a Model A.  On visiting Yellowstone, my father inadvertently stepped between a she-bear and her cub; she bit his leg as if to say “not a good idea”.  Mama Dee addresses that event and the aftermath.  The second occasion was Bill’s entering basic training for the United States Marine Corps during World War II.

Near the end of her life, when she was widowed, in generally poor health and with her two daughters and their families living hundreds of miles away, Mama Dee was unhappy.  I found many additional letters my father had saved, mostly addressed to Gen and Lucile.  Mama Dee and Louie had a home on Navilla Place in Covina but now she was living in a “board and care” situation.  She wrote letter after letter repeatedly asking why she could not live in her own home; she could not understand why she had to stay there.  I do not know the circumstances but I suspect she was physically unable to leave and unable to live alone without help.  The letters were so sad I could not keep them.  She passed away on May 17, 1951.

Stories - the Insight into Mama Dee
To close on a lighter note, I would like to share a few stories about Mama Dee; stories which I learned from Cecil Hibsch, Delia’s nephew, the son of her sister, Martha Bashor and a wonderful man in his own right.  The first two stories involve Louie.

The old phrase’ “opposites attract,” seems appropriate here.  Delia and Louie were physically quite different.  Delia was tall and slender as a young woman.  Louie was short and stout.  He grew more stout with age.  Delia was reserved and tried to act with dignity.  Louie was more gregarious and often accused her of “putting on airs” according to Cecil.  Apparently there was a certain social occasion at their home and Louie was downstairs entertaining the guests who were used to Delia making her grand entrance down the stairs.  Unfortunately, this entrance was ruined when Delia slipped on a rug, fell and broke her arm.  Years later, when Louie would remind her of this incident, she would just glare at him.

The second story is not nearly as painful (physically at least).  As I mentioned, Delia was very active in the church and on Sundays she made it her business to visit the inmates in the local jail and sing hymns to them.  According to Cecil, Louie always said this constituted “cruel and unusual punishment”.

The final story involved birdseed.  Cecil told me this story in the late 1960’s.  Mama Dee had some canaries and she found a magazine ad for mail-order birdseed which was guaranteed to make the birds sing more sweetly.  It is unknown whether the birdseed improved their singing but Delia was delighted after a few weeks to note a new plant in her garden.  She was in the habit of dumping detritus from the bottom of the cage outside the window and here was a new, fast growing plant that produced its own seed pods.  She would never have to buy seeds again!

Now the story continues that she had a small butter and egg business.  One day, one of the neighbors, “a Spanish lady” stopped by to make a purchase and admired the large seed-producing plant.  The next week the sheriff dropped in and informed Mama Dee that she had to remove this outlawed marijuana plant.  Delia was mortified that she had an illegal plant in her yard, but was angrier still that she had to start buying birdseed again.  Couldn’t the sheriff just ignore her plant?  She wasn’t going to do anything illegal; but no, the plant had to go.


Saturday, July 4, 2015

Thomas Cresap, my American Revolution Patriot

Today, the Fourth of July, I'm reprising my blog post about Thomas Cresap.  He was quite a guy--can you see yourself living in frontier Maryland?

Thomas Cresap was not a large man; he was stockily built, his muscles were hard, and his great strength was a byword on the frontier.  He was born about 1694 in Skipton, Yorkshire, England and emigrated to America when about 15 years old. 

Thomas Cresap was my 7th great-grandfather.  Continue reading...

Friday, January 23, 2015

Sign on the Dotted Line!

Today, January 23rd, is National Handwriting Day.  The writing instrument manufacturers association created the day to celebrate the lost art of handwriting in the computer age.  I guess there's some merit to their lament since I'm writing this post on my laptop!

When I saw this on GeneaBlogger's "Daze of the Week" it seemed an easy link to family history.  I thought about the writings of my ancestors but alas, there's only one in my files and will be used for another post.

But - I have signatures!  Genealogists love signatures - they provide a unique connection to our ancestors.  Look at the handwriting and imagine him or her signing the document.  The nature of document speaks volumes about their emotions at the time.  Excitement?  Sadness?  My great-great-grandmother's brother attested to her lunacy at her commitment hearing.  That was in 1881 - my oldest signature shown below.  My most recent and only woman's signature was in 1960 when my grandmother applied for membership in the Daughters of the American Revolution.

So, here are my ancestor's signatures, the name of the document and a link to their profile if available.  (Click on image to enlarge)

Alva L. Hutson, 1903,
Application for Homestead, Renville County, North Dakota
My great-grandfather Alva L. Hutson was 24 when he
began homesteading in North Dakota.   

John Earnest Hibsch, 1918,
WWII Draft Registration Card
My great-great uncle "Johnny" was 38 when he registered for the WWII draft. He was in Group C - considered too old to serve.

Cephas Adolph Eisenmann, 1917,
WWI Draft Registration Card
My great-grandfather Cephas A. Eisenmann was 43 when 
he registered for the draft.  He also was considered too old to serve.   

Alba William Hibsch, 1917,
WWI Draft Registration Card
My grandfather Alba William Hibsch went to Camp Stewart, Virginia then shipped out to France and was discharged at Camp Kearny, California.

Mahlon Clark, 1881,
Affidavit of Lunacy of his sister Jane Clark Brown
How difficult was it for Mahlon to testify in court that his sister Jane was insane? 

Ethel Kendall Hibsch, 1960,
Daughters of the American Revolution application
This is the only document I have showing of my grandmother's 
signature with her maiden and married names.

 I think great-grandfather Alva L. Hutson was the happiest as he signed the homestead papers and began farming his own land for what would be nearly 20 years. My great-great-uncle Mahlon Clark's emotions were  probably mixed with sadness and relief.

Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Epilogue - 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge

Thank you to Amy John Crow and her blog series "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks", a challenge on No Story Too Small.  I finished the challenge and learned more about my ancestors than I did before.

I didn't want to end the Challenge with just the 52nd post. Something extra was needed - like a bow on a package, a cherry on top of the sundae.  How about a list befitting the end of the year?  I have two to wrap up 2014:

Top 10 Most-Read Posts 

  1. Mrs. Mary Daulton Clark Identified Using Two Key Resources (#33)
  2. Ethel May Kendall Hibsch, the First Family Historian (#48)
  3. Henry M. Kendall, Orange Juice in his Blood (#47)
  4. John Ernest Hübsch 1838-1909 (#1)
  5. James Hutson Abandoned Family (#4)
  6. Ida May Brown Kendall, My Mystery Woman (#10)
  7. Comings and Goings of Adam Clark, 1842-1926 (#7) 
  8. Thomas Brown, Native of Ohio 1844-1927 (#8)
  9. Jane Clark Brown 1846-1918 (#2)
  10. Cephas A. Eisenman 1874-1946, Lifelong Minnesotan (#9)*

My Top 5 Ancestors**
  1. Ethel M. Kendall Hibsch and Alba W. Hibsch: my grandparents - I just need more time to get to know you and have a Root Beer float.
  2. Jane Clark Brown: why did you really live in an insane asylum most of your life?
  3. John Ernest Hübsch:  tell me about your hometown in Prussia and sailing to America.
  4. Thomas Cresap: how did you survey the wilderness and were you as vile as they said?
  5. Rebecca Cresap Ogle:  tell me about frontier life in Ohio and raising 13 children.
     +1 Alva Leo Hutson: let's talk about homesteading in early 1900s North Dakota over a bowl of  your ice cream.

Thank you for reading  about my ancestors throughout the past year.  I hope you'll continue to read my blog and remember to post a comment about your thoughts.  Much appreciated!

 *resulted in a cousin connection!
**of course I'd like to talk to all of my ancestors but this list includes the ones who especially piqued my curiosity.

Thomas Cresap, Maryland Frontiersman, Pathfinder and Patriot (52 Ancestors #52)

This is the final article for the series "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks", a challenge by Amy Johnson Crow on No Story Too Small.  I made it!

Thomas Cresap was not a large man; he was stockily built, his muscles were hard, and his great strength was a byword on the frontier.[1] He was born about 1694 in Skipton, Yorkshire, England and emigrated to America when about 15 years old. [2]

Thomas Cresap was my 7th great-grandfather.

Google map showing Skipton in relation to London
[click images to enlarge]

Not much is known about him until he married Hannah Johnson on 30 Apr 1727.  She was the daughter of Daniel Johnson and Frances who also emigrated from England to Maryland as early as 1698.  Daniel and Frances and their six daughters lived on a 100 acre plantation in Lapidum, Harford County, Maryland. [3] 

Thomas and Hannah's children included sons Daniel, Thomas, Robert and Michael, and daughters Sarah and Elizabeth.[4] 

Among his diverse occupations were those of land speculator, French and Indian fighter, army commissary, guide and explorer, Indian agent, cartographer, road builder, politician, fur-trader, planter, and colonial traveler.[5]

Stood His Ground
His infamous tenacity was revealed during one of his many land disputes.  In 1730, Thomas, Hannah and young son Daniel settled on land deeded by Lord Baltimore on the Susquehanna, [possibly  current day Havre de Grace], land that the Pennsylvanians claimed as their own although they had not conducted a survey to determine the actual boundaries between Pennsylvania and Maryland.   He mightily defended the land but to no avail as the house was burned causing his family to seek shelter in a nearby friendly Indian village.  The Penns captured and imprisoned him for a year in Philadelphia.   His captors offered to release him earlier because of his vile behavior but he demanded a trial believing his was a just cause.  Upon order of the King to free prisoners on both sides of the boundary dispute, he agreed to the release.  It was during this period, when he was hauled to jail in chains through the streets of Philadelphia, that the crowd shouted “Maryland Monster”.  The boundary dispute continued for several years and was eventually settled legally in 1750.[6] 

Lord Baltimore commissioned Thomas Cresap a justice of the peace in the early 1730s.[7]  By 1734, he was made a captain in the Maryland militia.  He was referred to as “Colonel” in court records of 1747 but no official record of appointment has been found.[8]

Cresap’s Fort
His frontier post in Oldtown exemplified Thomas’s keen ability to strategically locate his base of operations.  In 1741 at age 47, he established Skipton, a frontier post at the site of the abandoned Indian village of Shawanese Old Town.  The shortened name Oldtown stuck though and stills exists today.[9]  Here, Col. Cresap built and lived in a stone house, situated on a high hill about one-half of a mile southeast of the town, and within four hundred yards of the Potomac River.  The house had very thick stone walls, and only two rooms, each about twenty feet square.  The building was known in early times as “Cresap’s Fort” and often afforded shelter to the inhabitants of the country for miles around during the forays of the Indians….”  The house also served as a rendezvous for settlers in more peaceful times. [10]  Due to the post’s strategic location near frequently traveled trails, Cresap kept it fully supplied for visitors and traders.

Indians as well stopped on their travels and partook of Thomas’s hospitality with the kettle for which they nicknamed him “Big Spoon”.   He waged war against some Indians yet befriended others.  It was the Indians who sheltered his wife and son after his house was burned and he was imprisoned.  An Indian named Nemacolin became attached to Cresap, took his sons hunting and when migrating south with his tribe, he left his young son with Thomas to raise and educate.[11] 

The treaty between the chiefs of the Six Nations and the Maryland commissioners of 30 Jun 1744 set forth geographic boundaries which included Col. Cresap’s “hunting or trading cabin”.  From the fact that this treaty embraced Cresap’s settlement, and did not include that portion where Fort Cumberland was afterwards located, and that there were no other settlements nearer than the Conococheague, it is evident that Cresap was the first actual settler of Allegany County [Maryland].[12]  

George Washington (yes, that George)
The first meeting of Thomas Cresap and 15 year old George Washington, who was surveying Lord Fairfax’s western lands, was in March 1747.  Washington sheltered at Cresap’s inn for five days due to inclement weather.[13]  Over the years, Washington’s journal cited other visits to Cresap’s establishment in Oldtown. [14]

Ohio Land Company
Thomas Cresap was one of the charter members of the Ohio Land Company.  A land grant from the British government was given in 1749 to a group of Virginians and Marylanders.  They so-named it because their task was to explore and settle a portion of that vast territory draining into the Ohio River.  They were given a grant of five hundred thousand acres of land on the Ohio between the Monongahela and the Kanawha Rivers, of which number two hundred thousand were to be settled immediately.  The grant was made free from quit rent or tax to the Crown on the condition that one hundred families were settled there within seven years.[15]  Cresap’s role in the Ohio Company was to lay out and mark a road from Will’s Creek to the mouth of the Monongahela, the present site of Pittsburg.   He was assisted by a friendly Indian named Nemacolin.[16]  The road has had several names over the years including Gist’s Trace, Nemocolin’s Path, Washington’s Road, [General] Braddock’s Road, and the National Pike.[17] 

Cresap’s Land Holdings
Of all of Thomas’s occupations mentioned earlier, land speculator and surveyor likely brought him his wealth.   Records indicate that he acquired 760 acres from 1739-1743 for Long Meadow; 155 acres in 1742 for Linton; and 160 acres in 1752 for Leeds.[18]

American Revolution 1775-1783
His formation of the Maryland Sons of Liberty in 1765 to suppress the Stamp Act showed his separation from England.  Then, in 1774, he firmly planted himself on the side of the Patriot’s efforts against the British stronghold over the Colonies.  He was 81 at the beginning of the American Revolution.   Not surprisingly, he wasn’t a participant in field operations as was his son Michael Cresap, but became an elected delegate from Frederick County to the Maryland Provincial Convention.  Thomas was named as one of the Committee of Observation and Committee of Safety.  Maryland needed supplies and he was tasked to raise money for arms and ammunition.  And, once again, the Maryland Sons of Liberty organization was activated with Cresap as a prominent promoter.

At the close of the American Revolution, Thomas was about 90.  In his journal entry of 17 May 1785, Major Andrew Endicott, a civil engineer, wrote of his visit with him at Oldtown “…This evening I spent with the celebrated Col. Cresap. He is now more than 100 years old. He lost his eyesight about 18 months past, but his other faculties are yet unimpaired, his sense strong and manly, and his ideas flow with ease."[19]  His will, dated 17 Jan 1784, was 'signed' with his mark instead of his signature which may support the report of blindness.

Frontiersman to be Reckoned With
He had his detractors, mostly Pennsylvanians, who disdained him as profane, incendiary, and a rattlesnake.   His admirers pointed to his achievements and cite circumstances where any man would act likewise to defend life and property.  And again, Indians called him Big Spoon.[20]  Nobody described him as blood-thirsty but more as ambitious for land and settling the west.  His intimate knowledge of the landscape made him more often than not the go-to guy for surveying the vast wilderness.   

Late Life
Hannah died before 1774 according to the Cresap Society.  Thomas may have married a second time, at age 80, to the widow Mrs. Margaret Milburn, but no record of the marriage exists other than the writings of Michael Cresap’s biographer, John J. Jacob.  Thomas died in 1790.

Grave of Thomas Cresap at Oldtown, Allegany, Maryland
Source: Find-a-Grave.com

Thomas Cresap lived in a time of remarkable history of colonial America.  He arrived in America poor but amassed wealth through strategic land purchases.  He became a chief agent for land speculation for the British yet turned his allegiance to America when tightening British rule intruded on his own ambitions.

My Lineage[21]
My Grandma Ethel joined the Daughters of the American Revolution.  Should I?

Thomas Cresap, 1694-1790
 Married 1727 to Hannah Johnson 1705-abt 1774
  Son Daniel Cresap, 1728-1798
   Married (second) 1750 to Ruth Swearingen, 1728-
    Daughter Mary Cresap, 1760-1838
     Married 1777 to William Ogle, 1751-1810
      Daughter Rebecca Cresap Ogle, 1786-1860
       Married 1804 to Stephen Clark, 1770-
        Son BenjaminDaniel Clark, 1815-1895
         Married (first) 1836 to Hannah Carrigan, 1815-1854
          Daughter Jane Clark, 1846-1918
           Married 1866 to Thomas Brown, 1843-1927
            Daughter Ida May Brown, 1868-1955
             Married Henry Martin Kendall, 1864-1937
              Daughter Ethel May Kendall, 1899-1988
               Married Alba William Hibsch, 1896-1959
                Son Robert Martin Hibsch, 1923-2014
                 Married 1946 to Betty Evelyn Hutson, 1926=2000
                  Daughter Denise Hibsch Richmond, me

Future Research
  • Profile  my direct line of descendants of Thomas Cresap
  • Read the dozens of biographies and books that include Thomas Cresap 

[1] Bailey, Kenneth P. Thomas Cresap, Maryland Frontiersman. Boston, Mass: Christopher Pub. House, 1944. Pg 25. Database: WorldCat. Online view: HathiTrust Digital Library. Copyright:  Public Domain, Google-Digitized.
[2] Cresap, Joseph Ord, 1883-1961. The History of the Cresaps. McComb, Miss.: Cresap Society, 1937. Pg 31. Database: WorldCat. Online view: HathiTrust Digital Library. Copyright:  Public Domain, Google-Digitized.
[3] Ibid Pg 19.
[4] Scharf, John Thomas. 2003. History of Western Maryland: Being a History of Frederick, Montgomery, Carroll, Washington, Allegany, and Garrett Counties from the Earliest Period to the Present Day, Including Biographical Sketches of Their Representative Men. Page 76. Genealogical Publishing Com.
[5] Bailey, Kenneth P. Thomas Cresap, Maryland Frontiersman. Boston, Mass: Christopher Pub. House, 1944. Pg 22. Database: WorldCat. Online view: HathiTrust Digital Library. Copyright:  Public Domain, Google-Digitized.
[6] Cresap, Joseph Ord, 1883-1961. The History of the Cresaps. McComb, Miss.: Cresap Society, 1937. Pg 71-73 {Title No. 547866; Book Call No. 929.273 C863c 1987} Digitized by FamilySearch Intl. http://www.familysearch.org/.
[7] Ibid, page 45.
[8] Ibid, page 483.
[9] Scharf, John Thomas. History of Western Maryland: Being a History of Frederick, Montgomery, Carroll, Washington, Allegany, and Garrett Counties from the Earliest Period to the Present Day, Including Biographical Sketches of Their Representative Men. Vol 1. Genealogical Publishing Com, 2003. Pg 1458. Print.
[10] Ibid, page 93.
[11] Cresap, Joseph Ord, 1883-1961. The History of the Cresaps. McComb, Miss.: Cresap Society, 1937. Pg 114. {Title No. 547866; Book Call No. 929.273 C863c 1987} Digitized: FamilySearch Intl.  http://www.familysearch.org/.
[12] Scharf, John Thomas. History of Western Maryland: Being a History of Frederick, Montgomery, Carroll, Washington, Allegany, and Garrett Counties from the Earliest Period to the Present Day, Including Biographical Sketches of Their Representative Men. Vol 1. Genealogical Publishing Com, 2003. Pg 1458. Print.
[13] Cresap, Joseph Ord, 1883-1961. The History of the Cresaps. McComb, Miss.: Cresap Society, 1937. Pg 13; 87. {Title No. 547866; Book Call No. 929.273 C863c 1987} Digitized: FamilySearch Intl. http://www.familysearch.org/.
[14] Bailey, Kenneth P. Thomas Cresap, Maryland Frontiersman. Boston, Mass: Christopher Pub. House, 1944. Pg 67-68. Database: WorldCat. Online view: HathiTrust Digital Library. Google-Digitized.
[15] Cresap, Joseph Ord, 1883-1961. The History of the Cresaps. McComb, Miss.: Cresap Society, 1937. Pg 89. {Title No. 547866; Book Call No. 929.273 C863c 1987} Digitized: FamilySearch Intl.  http://www.familysearch.org/.
[16] Scharf, John Thomas. History of Western Maryland: Being a History of Frederick, Montgomery, Carroll, Washington, Allegany, and Garrett Counties from the Earliest Period to the Present Day, Including Biographical Sketches of Their Representative Men. Vol 1. Genealogical Publishing Com, 2003. Pg 75. Print.
[17] Cresap, Joseph Ord, 1883-1961. The History of the Cresaps. McComb, Miss.: Cresap Society, 1937. Pg 91. {Title No. 547866; Book Call No. 929.273 C863c 1987} Digitized: FamilySearch Intl.  http://www.familysearch.org/.
[18] Ibid, pages 983-985;
[19] Bailey, Kenneth P. Thomas Cresap, Maryland Frontiersman. Boston, Mass: Christopher Pub. House, 1944. Pg 163. Database: WorldCat. Online view: HathiTrust Digital Library. Google-Digitized.
[20] Ibid, pages 178-182.

Friday, December 26, 2014

Rebecca Cresap Ogle Clark, Pioneer of Adams County, Ohio (52 Ancestors #51)

This is another article for the series "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks", a challenge by Amy Johnson Crow on No Story Too Small.

My 4th great-grandmother, Rebecca Cresap Ogle, was the daughter of William Ogle and Mary Cresap Ogle.  She was born 22 Oct 1786 near Sinking Spring, Brush Creek Township, Adams or Highland County, Ohio. [1]  

Rebecca married Stephen Clark on 12 Jul 1804.[2]  He may have been the first pioneer in the settlement of Flat Run.[3]  Certainly many of my Clark ancestors were buried at Flat Run Cemetery, including Stephen and Rebecca.  Continued research should confirm the relationship of the settlement and the cemetery as well as Sinking Spring.

1804 Marriage of Stephen Clark and Rebecca Cresap Ogle [3]
[click images to enlarge]
Stephen and Rebecca had 13 children:[4]
  • Phoebe Clark 1805-1853
  • Ellen Clark 1807-1865
  • William Clark, died in Missouri
  • Sidney Clark 
  • Margaret Clark 1812-1887
  • Edith Clark  1814-1863
  • Benjamin Daniel Clark 1815-1895 [my 3rd great-grandfather]
  • Drusilla Clark 
  • Emily Clark 1819-1847
  • Fanny Clark 1821- 
  • Miss Clark 
  • Miss Clark 
  • Stephen Clark 1825-1916 

I would consider Rebecca a frontier woman of Adams County.  The region was wilderness in her time, densely forested with no roads.[5]  Rivers, streams and creeks were plentiful.  Deer, elk, buffalo, bears and turkeys were abundant, while the river furnished excellent fish.[6]  Hominy was a good substitute for bread, or parched corn pounded and sifted, then mixed with a little maple sugar and eaten dry; or, mixed with water was a good beverage.   Clothing made from deer skin sufficed.  Deer's hair or oak leaves put into moccasins were worn in place of stockings or socks.  Wearing a linsey shirt or dress made of buffalo wool was top-notch attire.  Wearing a calico dress was considered finely dressed.  The cabins had a door but no windows.  Furniture consisted of stools, and bedsteads made with forks driven into the ground and poles laid on these with the bark of the trees. They rocked their children in a sugar trough or pack-saddle. The cooking utensils consisted of a pot, dutch oven, skillet, frying pan, wooden trays and trenchers. The table was made of a broad slab.[7] 

Rebecca died on 10 Apr 1860 at age 74 at West Union Township, Adams County, Ohio.  Stephen Clark preceded her in death in 1853 near Sinking Spring, Highland County, Ohio.[8]

Grave of Rebecca Cresap Ogle Clark
at Flat Run Cemetery, Adams County, Ohio
Source: Find-a-Grave  

Rebecca lived in the period when America became an official country in 1789.  My existence proves she survived amid many challenges of frontier life, from uncharted land, wild animals, Indians and diseases, maybe even isolation and loneliness save the children.  Oh, to be able to talk to her today.

Future Research
  • Obtain church, tax and probate records
  • Research historical writings of Adams County and locales where she lived
  • Study DAR records
  • Locate descendants of Rebecca and Stephen


[1] Depending on boundary changes
[2] Birth, marriage and death dates and locations from Ethel M. Kendall Hibsch’s  [my grandmother] approved membership application for the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR).
[3] Scott, Daniel. 1890. A History of the Early Settlement of Highland County, Ohio. The Gazette.  Page 61. Accessed online version via HathiTrust.
[5] Evans, Nelson Wiley, and Emmons B. Stivers. 1900. A History of Adams County, Ohio: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Including Character Sketches of the Prominent Persons Identified with the First Century of the Country’s Growth ... E B. Stivers. Page 51.
[6] Ibid page 53
[7] Ibid page 54
[8] See Footnote 1